Chasing Aginili: “My Older Brother”

Syllables for Aginili

This is my four-month journey of how I got from using “Big Brother” to Aginili, and is an example of why learning a language instead of using “found” words is beneficial/aggravating.

I am learning Tsalagi/Cherokee over the next few years to build up a prequel novel to Fodder for Pigs. It will also enrich my current novel. At your leisure, read this full post about why I chose to do this.

I wanted to find a suitable replacement for Big Brother’s “name”. The term “Big Brother” has many unneeded connotations exclusive to TV show names, political statements, etc. He just needs to be a protective, though grumpy, older brother.

He will not give his actual name because he doesn’t want people, particularly ones he doesn’t like, to use it. That would disrespectful and sort of embarrassing for him. I began to put my feelers out for a new term that encompasses who he is and what he does.

My naive self thought I had the answer

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#WIPjoy: About Fodder for Pigs

I realized I don’t talk about my work in progress much, at least not with people who don’t have a reason to care. One of the groups I admin did the #WIPjoy tag a while back, and I thought it was pretty fun! It is a good exercise in getting us to think about our work and communicate what it means to us.

#1 INTRODUCE YOUR WIP…

Fodder for Pigs is a historical Fiction/Thriller set in 1850s Alabama and Georgia. This is my attempt at a blurb as of right now. It will change like fifty more times, guaranteed.

Blood don’t wash off yo’ shirt; it sho’ as hell don’t wash off yo’ soul.

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Why I chose to learn Tsalagi as research

Tsalagi syllabaryLearn a new language as research? Crazy lady! I decided to learn Tsalagi/Cherokee over the next five years. Logical, since I have [almost] nobody with whom to speak this new language? No! But I have found a way to work it in and have about a week left of syllabary learning. Then it is on to the language basics.

I want to make a believable and respectful representation of people in my novel’s time period

By the late 1820’s, after George Guess (or George Gist/Sequoya) developed the Cherokee Syllabary, most of the Nation read and wrote this language. It was important to read the news and communicate at that time. Laws and treaties were being made without them being able to verify any information. At least with this written language, they could have something with which to create and preserve their own government.

I have some Cherokee characters in Fodder for Pigs, but most are only half Native. Given the time period and circumstances, they experience a rapid loss in culture and language. What that means for me is that I need to explore what this loss entails and how to present it accurately and with respect. History books are not enough. The internet is not enough. Cherokee/English dictionaries will have me using any one of seven words for the same object, and I know I am in deep you-know-what if I choose the wrong one.

Language is the way into the culture, forgotten or otherwise

I am encountering countless things every day that enrich my characters and plot.

I realized while researching words, meanings, traditions, etc. that some concepts in English do not exist in other languages. Take for example, “goodbye.” English uses this often. “Goodbye” for early Cherokee was too final. They would rather have said the equivalent of “be strong” or “I will see you later.”

Another example is Aniyvwiya, or the Real People/Principal People. This is how the people used to refer to themselves. Since the nation was matrilineal, only people with Cherokee mothers were Aniyvwiya. If I had not dived right into the language, I would have used it incorrectly. Half of my characters do not have Cherokee mothers.

Even though the old culture was fairly documented by both English and Cherokee speakers, there are few ways to accurately experience it halfway across the country in the 21st century. In this case, the internet, library, and databases have been beneficial to connect with material and native speakers involved in history. Not every Native American knows exactly what happened 150 years ago. Do I know what happened 150 years ago in Hungary? Nope!

So far I have learned enough to make significant changes in my Book One narrative, family dynamics being the most changed. David and Sarah are part of a broken and blended family and they live their early years on the fringes of a dying culture. Having a white mother means more than being a little confused. Since bloodlines were carried through mothers, they had no clan membership. No clan membership means no protection, at least not the depth they will need.

Languages are disappearing

Very few people speak the dialect I am learning, and yes, maybe I will have to learn another to actually talk with people, but it is better than it dying out. A dialect of this language has already died.

Even a written language can be in danger of dying out. Fires can and have destroyed entire libraries of original documents across the world, and languages are in trouble. 2019 is suitably the International Year of Indigenous Languages.

Language learning is important for spelling accuracy

Not only am I learning to accurately form an image of what their lives were like, I am not going to copy and paste incorrect words into my story. More on that in my upcoming post: Chasing Aginili.

To follow my progress each weak, check out my Instagram.

Is it Character Weakness or Strength?

People dancing wildly

Bring some sense to your characters

We often focus on our characters’ weakness. This is fine because everyone has a weakness and that makes them relatable, but what if we focus on their strengths? We get more defined characters. According to psychologist Don Clifton, each strength, when used at the wrong time or inappropriately, can be seen by others as a weakness.

If we can make the over-application of character strengths to work in our writerly favor, we have crafted better characters

Example: Sally has a commanding strength. This is great in tight situations where somebody needs to take charge. People listen to her when the going gets tough. It’s her best strength so it comes natural, and she sometimes uses it when she doesn’t need to. When she tells people what to do in casual situations, they think she is bossy.

Often, a person can have strengths that counteract each other or fight for dominance

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Book Blurb Practice

Writing is hardThe book blurb is one of the most important deciding factors in a book purchase. That’s a lot of pressure. I’m kind of freaking out about it. As I tidy up my second round of beta readers and head into the last editing round, my mind comes back to this and slaps me upside the head.

“Write a better blurb!” My mind is quite blunt.

Here I go then, kicking and screaming to the blurb writing phase. In order to get better, I have to lay out my thoughts here so I can practice writing book blurbs.

What is a blurb

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After NaNoWriMo: Self-Editing

Buzz shows Woody that there are adverbs everywhere. Disappointed.

The 50k word challenge is done! Now is the time to self-edit. Why am I tired of it already?

I have been self-editing book one and two of my historical fiction thriller, Fodder for Pigs, the entire month of November and then some. Editing is hard work and I appreciate people who do it as a job.

Even though there are professionals out there to help us, it is still essential that we writers learn to self-edit. A polished manuscript gets more constructive attention from alpha readers, beta readers, editors, agents, and publishers. They have to be able to see the story without getting distracted by mistakes we can fix ourselves. Once they see the story, they can focus on the nitty gritty details, if that’s what they are ultimately there to do.

I’ve noticed several things about writing during this process and will list them here in order of completion:

The first draft is crap

No matter how much I thought I polished it (7 times!), the first draft was just a draft and never progressed to second draft status. I got great feedback but more disappointing feedback. This is why one should do developmental edits before reaching out to readers. Continue reading

On John Ross and Perseverance

John and Mary Ross

This photo is from the Oklahoma Historical Society

I don’t often share themes from my stories but I will say this: they boil my blood, and they show me perseverance.

Today I had to brush up on my John Ross timeline. Can you imagine spending your life and energy in Washington to keep your people in their homes, and coming back to find that your own house has been taken? Given away, actually. Everything you built, every memory, signed away by people not authorized to speak for an entire nation. It is in somebody else’s hands and there is nothing you can do to get it back. None of the 17,000 people who backed your petition are of any consequence.

How did this come to be? Why is this important? WHO IS THIS GUY? If one is not familiar with the Cherokee Nation’s struggle, that person is probably thoroughly confused by now. Here is some background information. The entire story is so much more complex than what I have written here, and I encourage each reader to follow the links at the end of this post and also do more research.

Who is John Ross? Continue reading

The Why Test

confusing sign“No, we can’t go to the park.”

“But why?”

“Because I said so.”

That never worked, did it? It doesn’t work on readers either.

If our stories can’t pass the Why Test, there is a motivation problem. The problem may be even deeper than why we allow something to happen, or a character to act a certain way. Does the part/person in question have a justified existence?

Let’s try it on my first draft of Fodder for Pigs.

I had to rip this information out of my head, and my readers probably would have done the same if they could reach me. Watch as it gets better in increments:

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